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Glenn County: Community Meeting Series

Updated:

COMMUNITY MATTERS:

HOUSING GROWS GLENN COUNTY

Community Meeting Series Report

June 3, 2024

Executive Summary

Community Matters: Housing Grows Glenn County was a series of five community meetings held in Hamilton City, Orland, and Willows in 2022-23 and hosted by the Glenn County Community Action Department. The series was intended to build upon community engagement efforts around housing needs which Glenn County began in 2018 through a Housing Needs Assessment, a 10 Year Plan to Address Homelessness in 2019, and a 5-Year Funding Plan and Application for the Permanent Local Housing Allocation (PLHA) program in 2020. The Community Meeting Series was intended to engage the general public in a conversation about the need for housing of all types, and to garner input on their unique experiences and perspectives to help inform County decision-making into the future. Discussion topics included accessory dwelling units (ADUs), homeownership, mobile homes, rehabilitation, and affordable, market-rate, and workforce housing. The series was free and open to the public and all stakeholders. This report summarizes input received during the meetings and provides key takeaways, key partners, and concrete next steps. 

Brief Recent History of Building Upon Housing Community Engagement Work 

Beginning in 2018, the County of Glenn started to actively engage in evaluating the status and condition of its housing market, and the need for a variety of housing types to meet the needs of diverse populations within the County, as well as applying for State of California funding sources to address these needs. This began with a Housing Needs Assessment conducted in 2018 (which was subsequently updated in 2020), the development of a 10-Year Plan to End Homelessness in 2019 as part of the No Place Like Home (NPLH) funding opportunity to develop permanent supportive housing, and a 5-Year Funding Plan and Application for the Permanent Local Housing Allocation (PLHA) program in 2020. For the PLHA program, the County and the Cities of Willows and Orland submitted a joint Plan and Application, with the Cities delegating administrative authority for the funds to the County. 

In addition, all of the local jurisdictions in the County (County of Glenn, City of Willows, and City of Orland) were engaged in the 6th Cycle update of their Housing Elements between 2020-24, which included community meetings and public hearings on housing needs and housing programs. The County of Glenn serves as the Lead Agency for the Dos Rios Continuum of Care (CoC) which consists of Colusa, Glenn, and Trinity Counties. As Lead Agency, the County conducts housing community engagement work with CoC member agencies, people who are unhoused, and the general public. This work includes, but is not limited to, Point-in-Time Counts and Local/Regional Homelessness Action Plans. 

Purpose 

Building upon the efforts described above, the Community Meeting Series was intended to engage the general public in a conversation about the need for housing of all types, and to garner input on their unique experiences and perspectives to help inform County decision-making into the future. The idea of the series was born from County conversations about the identified need to provide more information and education about housing and how a lack of adequate housing, especially affordable housing, negatively affects the County from an economic development and growth perspective. 

Overview 

Community Matters: Housing Grows Glenn County” was a series of five community meetings held in Hamilton City, Orland, and Willows in 2022-23 and hosted by the Glenn County Community Action Department. Discussion topics included accessory dwelling units (ADUs), homeownership, mobile homes, rehabilitation, and affordable, market-rate, and workforce housing. The series was free and open to the public and all stakeholders. 

People could attend any or all meetings to share their experiences and learn from others. The Community Meeting Series was divided into a Fall series mostly focused on rental housing and a winter series focused on mostly focused on homeownership. 

The Fall 2022 series consisted of three meetings:

  • Orland: September 14, 2022, held at Glenn County Office of Education, Glenn Success Square Conference Center
  • Willows: September 28, 2022, held at Glenn County Office of Education, Grapevine/Oakdale Conference Room
  • Hamilton City: October 19, 2022, held at Hamilton High School Library

The Winter 2023 series consisted of two meetings:

  • Orland: February 8, 2023, held at Glenn County Office of Education, Glenn Success Square Conference Center
  • Willows: March 1, 2023, held at Glenn County Office of Education, Grapevine/Oakdale Conference Room

Outreach 

Outreach was conducted through the posting of physical flyers at community locations, posts on County social media outlets, email announcements to engaged stakeholders, press releases in the local newspaper, and invitations to community leaders.

Glenn County staff conducted specialized outreach for the Hamilton City meeting. Based on the community population and needs, the County increased education and outreach in Hamilton City in the following ways:

  1. Mailers: Sent mailers of events and resources attached to residents’ water bills through the Hamilton City Community Services District. 
  2. In-Person: County staff who live in Hamilton City and are trusted by residents went to local grocery stores, parks, and libraries to provide information about events, resources, and services. 
  3. Language: All community meeting series materials were translated into Spanish and County staff who speak Spanish provided interpretation services during the meeting. 

This specialized outreach approach for Hamilton City was successful in the number of residents who attended the community meeting and the valuable input they provided during the meeting. The County has since adopted the approach for all education and outreach efforts in Hamilton City. 

Grindstone Indian Rancheria 

The County is actively engaged in meeting with tribal representatives from the Grindstone Indian Rancheria regarding housing and other needs. Initially, the County planned to hold a meeting at the Rancheria as part of the meeting series. Due to a number of factors, this did not come to fruition, but the County intends to continue to send staff representatives to tribal meetings. At some point in the future, a housing-specific meeting may be held. 

Context: Housing Needs Data

At the beginning of each community meeting, the County shared relevant data on housing needs within Glenn County and its incorporated jurisdictions, in order to provide context to the discussions.  Some of the highlights of this data are shown below.

Orland:

  • Over half of renter households earning less than $35,000 per year are paying 30% of more of their income towards housing costs and are considered housing-cost burdened. 
  • About 21% of all households are living below the poverty threshold.  Over half of these are single parent female-headed households. 
  • There are 272 publicly assisted affordable housing units and 29 Housing Choice Voucher holders in Orland. By comparison, there are 851 low-income households earning less than $25,000 annually.
  • From 2020-2021 there were 266 single-family detached units and 87 multi-family units built in Orland. 

Willows:

  • About 88% of renter households earn less than $35,000 annually (733 households) pay 30% of more of their income towards housing costs and are considered housing-cost burdened. 
  • About 19% of the population (1,103 people) has a disability in Willows. This is higher than the State average of 11%. 
  • Most units in Willows are older in age, with an estimated 70.6% of all housing units built before 1980.  Almost one in five were built before 1950.
  • There are an estimated 227 affordable rent-restricted units available to house an estimated 1,039 low-income households earning less than $35,000 in Willows, which is a shortfall of 812 affordable units.

Unincorporated Glenn County:

  • Just under 30% of total households are paying more than one-third of their monthly income towards rent and are considered housing-cost burdened. 
  • The number of senior households (ages 65+) grew 13.3% to 2,420 households between 2010 and 2018. 
  • From 2010 to 2019, Glenn County renters saw a large rent increase of 14.37%, while homeowners experienced a 0.8% decrease in housing costs. 
  • The number of housing units increased by 1.5% from 2010 to 2020 in the unincorporated area, most of which were single-family construction and mobile homes. 
  • Approximately 45% of the housing stock in the unincorporated county was built more than 50 years ago. 
  • An estimated 2,044 people in unincorporated Glenn County are employed in agriculture industries, which is 26% of all employed residents. 

Overview of Rental Housing Meetings 

Two meetings focused on rental housing were held in the Fall of 2022: one in Orland on September 14th and one in Willows on September 28th. Both meetings were held at the Glenn County Office of Education facilities in each city—the Success Square Conference Center in Orland and the Grapevine/Oakdale Conference Room in Willows. 

Summary of Presentation/Panel and Panelists

Each meeting began with a 15-minute presentation on housing needs for each community and a description of current local efforts to secure funding for housing projects. Data and information for the presentations were pulled from the Housing Element updates in progress for each city, the U.S. Census, the State Department of Housing and Community Development, and from interviews with County and City staff. 

Each meeting then transitioned into a roundtable conversation with a multi-family affordable developer panel. Rental affordable housing developers with current projects or a history of projects were invited to participate. The developer panel speakers and their organizations were:

  1. Seana O’Shaughnessy, Community Housing Improvement Program
  2. John Nicoletti, Habitat for Humanity Yuba/Sutter
  3. Ed Mayer, Housing Authority of the County of Butte
  4. Justin Solomon, Dawson Holdings Inc.

Each developer was asked to describe: their organization’s mission and the types of housing they build/own/manage; what housing projects they have built or are planning to build in Glenn County and what needs they address; and their organization’s priorities for the future in Glenn County. This allowed members of the audience the opportunity to “meet” affordable housing developers and better understand their mission, their vision, and their challenges in developing affordable housing.

Summary of Breakout Group Discussions 

After the panel presentation, the meeting participants were divided into breakout groups, usually 6-7 persons per group. The breakout groups had a set of guiding questions to help frame their conversation, and a group facilitator/notetaker from County staff was assigned to each group. Below is an abbreviated summary of the input provided in the breakout groups, organized by question in a table format.

BREAKOUT GROUP NOTES – RENTAL HOUSING MEETINGS

Question

Discussion

1. Is there anything from either the housing needs presentation or the affordable housing developer panel you found surprising or especially interesting?

Regarding the data presented for Willows, people commented on the low-income housing unit shortage, that 88% of renters in Willows make less than $35,000 annually, that the community has more individuals with disabilities than the State average, and that compared to Orland, Willows has much less development activity.

The growing senior population in need of housing and the number of female-led single parent households.

There are four developers interested and working in our County.

2. Are there community misconceptions about affordable housing or supportive housing?

Myths and stereotypes: affordable housing brings more people who are unhoused into our community; it will create a decrease in home values; it attracts crime; and it doesn’t help households who are working at jobs.

People do not understand that many seniors cannot afford their basic living costs.

Myth: the county has enough affordable housing.

3. What are your great concerns about rental housing needs in Glenn County?

Rents are increasing while wages are not increasing proportionately.

Lack of enough units, no growth in the housing market.

Quality and safety of existing units; and landlords getting away with substandard units.

Cost of building, including land acquisition.

4. Please describe any personal experiences or knowledge about gaps in the rental housing market.

Housing demand exceeds availability, and this drives up rental costs.

Wage/rent gap: must make three times the monthly rent to qualify and move in.

5. Is a lack of adequate rental housing impacting the community in terms of economic growth, including attracting new employers or allowing people to live and work in Glenn County?

Yes, increases commute times and deters community involvement, people spend money elsewhere because they are commuting, those who grew up here cannot stay here, and wages paid here don’t match housing costs.

6. How do you see supportive housing helping to address homelessness in Glenn County?

It is essential. Must offer supportive services, including education and skills building opportunities.

Any increase in affordable housing will result in decreases in the number of people who are unhoused. 

7. Discuss and share your thoughts and experiences regarding rental housing for seniors, individuals with disabilities, large families, and farmworkers. What is missing?

Housing for all of the groups listed.

No real options for persons with disabilities.

People need affordable housing with supportive services (i.e. permanent supportive housing).

8. How can you share with colleagues, family, and friends what you have learned tonight?

Encourage attendance at future meetings.

Key Findings 

  • There is an overall lack of enough affordable rental units in the County. 
  • Seniors and individuals with disabilities don't have many options, and they especially need affordable supportive housing because they are on fixed comes and may have a need for supportive services to live independently 
  • A lack of adequate rental housing means that the County cannot attract new employers and that young people who grow up here cannot afford to stay and work here. 
  • Wages are not keeping pace with the cost of housing 

Overview of All Housing Types Meeting 

A meeting to discuss all housing types was held in Hamilton City on October 19, 2022, at the Hamilton High School Library. 

Spanish Language Access 

Because Hamilton City is predominantly Hispanic/Latiné, live interpretation and slides/handouts in Spanish were important meeting features. There were enough Spanish-speaking residents at the meeting (six residents) to provide a separate table with an interpreter, which facilitated conversation and input from these residents. 

Summary of Presentation/Panel and Panelists

The meeting began with a 15-minute presentation on housing needs for Hamilton City and a description of current local efforts to secure funding for housing projects or programs that might benefit Hamilton City residents. Data and information for the presentations were pulled from the Housing Element update in progress for the County, the General Plan Update, the U.S. Census, the State Department of Housing and Community Development, and from interviews with County staff. 

The meeting then transitioned into a roundtable conversation with a multi-family affordable developer panel. Rental affordable housing developers with current projects or a history of projects were invited to participate. The developer panel speakers and their organizations were:

  1. Seana O’Shaughnessy, Community Housing Improvement Program
  2. John Nicoletti, Habitat for Humanity Yuba/Sutter
  3. Ed Mayer, Housing Authority of the County of Butte
  4. Justin Solomon, Dawson Holdings Inc.

Each developer was asked to describe their organization’s mission and the types of housing they build/own/manage; what housing projects they have built or are planning to build in Glenn County and what needs they address; and to describe their organization’s priorities for the future in Glenn County. This allowed members of the audience the opportunity to “meet” affordable housing developers and better understand their mission, their vision and their challenges in developing affordable housing. 

Summary of Breakout Group Discussions 

After the panel presentation, the meeting participants were divided into breakout groups, usually 6-7 persons per group. One breakout group was conducted entirely in Spanish, with live interpretation and written materials in Spanish. The breakout groups had a set of guiding questions to help frame their conversation, and a group facilitator/notetaker from County staff was assigned to each group. Below is an abbreviated summary of the input provided in the breakout groups, organized by question in a table format. 

Breakout Group Notes – All Housing Types Meeting

Question

Discussion

1. Is there anything from either the housing needs presentation or the affordable housing developer panel you found surprising or especially interesting?

There is a large percentage of the community who works in agriculture, but there are only 12 farmworker housing units in Hamilton City.

High percentage of households who are over-crowded.

High percentage of households who are cost-burdened.

The County is rezoning land in Hamilton City. 

2. Are there community misconceptions about affordable housing or supportive housing?

Stereotypes: If you accept subsidies, you aren’t taking care of yourself, you will pay no rent, you won’t take care of house, and/or you use drugs. 

People worry rent will increase if units are rehabilitated.

Misconception: The qualifications for affordable housing only apply to farmworkers; no understanding of how broad they are.

3. What are your great concerns about rental housing needs in Hamilton City and Glenn County?

Taxes and fees are high.

I want to become a homeowner, but need to understand credit, citizenship, legal status, funding available, and how to qualify for Community Housing Improvement Program (CHIP) housing.

Housing built in Hamilton City should be focused on the demographics of Hamilton City.

People move to neighboring communities because there is no housing for them.

Landlords that are absentee, increase rents, and do not maintain their properties. 

4. Please describe any personal experiences or knowledge about gaps in the rental housing or homeownership market.

Lack of single-family homes available; usually only one house for sale, and you have to act quickly.

Lack of senior housing.

Not understanding how to buy a home.

Many people only speak Spanish or Spanish is their first language. People don’t know how to access housing resources; there is a need for a local bilingual housing fair. 

5. Is a lack of adequate rental housing impacting the community in terms of economic growth, including attracting new employers or allowing people to live and work in Hamilton City and Glenn County?

Yes, there is a lack of vacant land resources for building; and most commercial buildings are now being used for residential. 

Yes, Hamilton City is a bedroom community. There is lack of public services, so there is no new growth.

6. How do you see supportive housing helping to address homelessness in Glenn County?

Prevents homelessness by allowing service provision/case management, and people can build skills to help them live and access education/training.

7. Discuss and share your thoughts and experiences regarding rental housing for seniors, individuals with disabilities, large families, and farmworkers. What is missing?

Senior housing.

Single family homes, especially those that are affordable.

Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs), due to lack of available land and how expensive it is to build.

Information that is relevant and understandable for those who speak Spanish (i.e. culturally competent).

8. How can you share with colleagues, family and friends what you have learned tonight?

Social meetings, work, church, and social media.

9. Is there anything else you would like to discuss? 

What is the follow up to this meeting? How will this information be used now that it has been collected?

I feel it is best to attend public meetings in person; I do not have the skills for online meetings.

Those in the Spanish-speaking group are interested in CHIP housing.

Key Findings and Highlights 

  • There is a lack of available land for housing in Hamilton City; and the County's rezone program through the General Plan update should help.
  • People want to stay in Hamilton City and need affordable options. 
  • Residents want information on how to apply for housing programs that are tailored to their needs, including in-person meetings and resource fairs in Spanish. 
  • Housing is needed for seniors. 

Overview of Homeownership Meetings 

Two meetings were held in the Winter of 2023 which focused on ownership housing: a meeting in Orland on February 8th, and a meeting in Willows on March 1st. Both meetings were held at the Glenn County Office of Education facilities in each city— the Success Square Conference Center in Orland and the Grapevine/Oakdale Conference Room in Willows. 

Summary of Presentation/Panel and Panelists

Each meeting began with a 15-minute presentation on ownership housing needs for each community and a description of current ownership (including mobile homes) and ADU projects and programs. Data and information for the presentations were pulled from the Housing Element updates in progress for each city, the U.S. Census, the State Department of Housing and Community Development, and from interviews with County and City staff. 

Each meeting then transitioned into a roundtable conversation with a panel representing ownership developers and programs focused on home sharing. Developers and program staff with current projects, planned projects, or a history of projects were invited to participate. The panel speakers and their organizations were:

  1. Jill Quezada, Community Housing Improvement Program
  2. John Nicoletti, Habitat for Humanity Yuba/Sutter
  3. Lauren Kennedy, Home & Heart and North Valley Housing Trust
  4. Rex Meredith, D.R. Horton (Orland meeting only)
  5. Frank Marinello, Basin Street Properties (Willows meeting only)

Each developer was asked to describe: their organization’s mission and the types of housing they build/own/manage; what housing projects they have built or are planning to build in Glenn County and what needs they address; and to describe their organization’s priorities for the future in Glenn County. In these meetings, the developers focused especially on the challenges of building single-family homes that are affordable for Glenn County residents’ incomes. This allowed members of the audience the opportunity to “meet” housing developers and housing program operators, and better understand their mission, their vision, and their challenges in developing affordable housing.

Summary of Breakout Group Discussion 

After the panel presentation, the meeting participants at the Orland meeting were divided into three breakout groups, approximately 6-7 persons per group; at the Willows meeting, there were two groups. Though it was open to the public, the meeting in Willows was not attended by general members of the public, so the breakout groups for the Willows meeting consisted of County staff and the speaker panel members. The breakout groups had a set of guiding questions to help frame their conversation, and a group facilitator/notetaker from County staff was assigned to each group. Below is an abbreviated summary of the input provided in the breakout groups, organized by question in a table format. 

Breakout Group Notes – Homeownership Meetings

Question

Discussion

1. Is there anything from either the presentation or the speaker panel you found surprising or especially interesting?

The idea of home sharing (Home & Heart program).

Orland has so many mobile home parks compared to Willows.

Willows has had so little building of new homes in the last 12 years.

Orland has a Housing Rehabilitation program.

2. Please describe any personal experiences or knowledge about gaps in the home ownership market. What is missing?

Lack of developers in the County.

“Move up” housing.

Affordable home ownership opportunities.

People are buying homes for investments to rent out, not to live in.

Willows has too much red tape, so builders don’t want to build here.

Funding to get people into home ownership with down payments.

Builders go to Butte County because they can make more profit there.

3. Is a lack of adequate ownership housing impacting the community in terms of economic growth, including attracting new employers, or allowing people to live and work in Orland/Willows and Glenn County? Why or why not?

Yes, employers cannot hire, or they lose employees due to lack of housing.

Hard to find specialty employees short term due to lack of rentals.

Businesses are growing in Orland because there is more housing there compared to Willows.

Yes, land is available, but developers don’t seem to want to develop here—they can make more money in Butte County.

4. Do you think that homeowners in Orland/Willows might have an interest in building an Accessory Dwelling Unit (ADU) on their property? What is needed to help promote ADUs as a source of housing?

Financing.

Contractors willing to build ADUs.

People need education on how to screen for and rent to others—when you have no experience as a landlord this is overwhelming.

Pre-approved floor plans that streamline the process.

Public education on what an ADU is, how you get one built, etc. 

5. Do you think that homeowners in Orland/Willows might have an interest in housing rehabilitation programs? Please describe any personal experiences or knowledge.

Yes, we have lots of older homes that need rehabilitation; some of these are rentals and the owners aren’t putting money into them to keep them up.

Programs would need to be promoted and people need assistance to get through the process.

If it is a loan, it will discourage people from participating; and the lien must be recorded in last position.

6. Do you think that promoting programs like ADUs and Home & Heart could help to address the needs of seniors, individuals with disabilities, and youth who want to stay in the community but cannot easily find or afford housing? Why or why not?

Yes, if people are paired up with others through a process that feels safe.

Must address language barriers to promote it.

Yes, seniors could stay in their homes and college students could have a place to live.

Yes, engaging realtors should be part of the process.

7. How can you share with colleagues, family, and friends what you have learned tonight?

Talking to people and sharing what we learned.

Share on social media.

Make it personal with everyone – have one-on-one conversations with people in-person about housing needs.

8. Is there anything else you would like to discuss? 

Hold a housing fair to promote programs.

There’s a gap between those who want to own a home and the programs to help them.

Key Findings and Highlights 

  • There is concern about builders' interest in developing single-family homes in Glenn County, although there is a more recent activity in Orland. 
  • There is a need for both starter homes and "move-up" homes.  
  • Home sharing may be a good solution for some households, especially seniors. 
  • Regarding ADUs, some people may be interested but need information on the approval process, funding and how to rent out a unit, as well as direct support such as pre-approval plans. 

Conclusion 

Summary of Community Meeting Series 

The Community Matters: Housing Grows Glenn County series was intended to engage residents and stakeholders in a conversation about housing needs and solutions. Meeting attendance was not as robust as hoped, for most of the meetings, the majority of attendees were County staff. Members of the public who did attend found the meetings valuable and offered insights and feedback that were very valuable. Notable in this regard was the meeting in Hamilton City, which had more members of the general public attend than any of the other meetings. This is likely attributed to the fact that a Spanish-speaking County staff person who lives in Hamilton City and is deeply engaged with the community did direct outreach to inform residents of the meeting. This speaks to the need for outreach to be “grassroots” focused, with personal invitations and the posting of physical flyers throughout the community. Social media posts did not appear to be particularly effective in generating interest in the meetings.  

The Community Meeting Series panels of multi-family affordable housing developers, ownership developers, and housing programs were particularly well-received by the meeting attendees. After their panel presentations the panelists joined the breakout group discussions and attendees were able to connect one-on-one with panelists in small groups. This is a model to consider continuing into future community engagement efforts. 

Key Takeaways

  1. There is an overall lack of enough affordable rental units in the County.
  2. Seniors and individuals with disabilities don’t have many options and they especially need affordable supportive housing because they are on fixed incomes and have need for supportive services to live independently.
  3. A lack of adequate rental housing means that the County cannot attract new employers and that young people who grow up here cannot afford to stay and work here.
  4. Wages are not keeping pace with the cost of housing.
  5. There is a lack of available land for housing in Hamilton City; and the County’s rezone program through the General Plan update should help.
  6. People want to stay in their communities and need affordable options.
  7. Hamilton City residents want information on how to apply for housing programs that is tailored to their needs, including in person meetings and resource fairs in Spanish.
  8. There is a concern about builders’ interest in developing single-family homes in Glenn County, although there is more recent activity in Orland.
  9. There is a need for both starter homes and “move up” homes.
  10. Home-sharing may be a good solution for some households, especially seniors.
  11. Regarding ADUs, some people may be interested but need information on the approval process, funding and how to rent out a unit, as well as direct support such as pre-approved plans.             

Definitions of Frequently Used Terms (in English)

AB 686 Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing: With the passage of AB 686, state and local public agencies are required to affirmatively further fair housing through deliberate action to explicitly address, combat, and relieve disparities resulting from past and current patterns of segregation to foster more inclusive communities.

Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs): Complete independent living facilities for one or more persons on the same lot as the primary structure. Can be attached or detached from the primary structure. Also known as second units or granny flats. 

Affordable Housing: The generally accepted measure for housing affordability is spending less than 30% of one’s gross household income on housing costs (including utilities, rent or mortgage principal and interest). Affordable housing generally receives subsidies, either during construction and/or during operations, in order to keep monthly rents at affordable levels. 

Housing Rehabilitation: Repairs to address deferred maintenance and aging of housing stock. May also address abatement of asbestos and lead paint, installation of energy efficiency measures, and removal of architectural barriers for those with mobility needs.

Infill Development: Refers to the process of developing vacant or under-used parcels within existing incorporated areas that are already largely developed.

Market-rate Housing: Housing where the “market” (supply/demand/other factors) sets the cost to the occupant and there are no public subsidies.

Mixed-Income Housing: Developments that comprise differing levels of affordability, with some units at market rate and others available to low-income households at below-market rates which are made available to income-qualified households.

Permanent Supportive Housing: Housing in which wrap-around supportive services, such as case management, counseling, education, and peer support are provided to tenants to support their self-sufficiency.

Glenn County Plan to End Homelessness (published July 2019)

Updated:

The County of Glenn, through its Community Action Department (CAD), in partnership with the Glenn County Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA), has commissioned this 10-Year Plan to End Homelessness (the “Plan”) for the purpose of laying out a focused and practical strategy for addressing the issue of homelessness in Glenn County. The Plan addresses the unique challenges and needs of those who are homeless in Glenn County, a small, rural county with limited resources. 

2023 Application for LIHEAP Program

Updated:

Applications for utility assistance and/or weatherization services through the 2023 LIHEAP program.  For more information, please call (530) 865-6129 or 1 (800) 287-8711.

Attachment Size
2023 LIHEAP Application - English (1.66 MB) 1.66 MB
2023 Aplicacion para LIHEAP - Español (1.63 MB) 1.63 MB

Dos Rios Continuum of Care Operating Manual

Updated:

The Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act of 2009 (HEARTH Act), enacted into law on May 20, 2009, consolidated the homeless assistance programs administered by HUD under the McKinney-Vento
Homeless Assistance Act into a single grant program, and revises the Emergency Shelter Grants program and renames it the Emergency Solutions Grants program. The HEARTH Act also codifies into law the Continuum of Care (CoC)
planning process, a longstanding part of HUD’s application process to assist homeless persons by providing greater community-wide coordination, decision-making, and leadership.
The Continuum of Care (CoC) Board is the group organized to carry out the responsibilities prescribed in the CoC Program Interim Rule. CoC governance responsibilities include:
- Planning for the CoC, Operating the CoC, and ensuring compliance with HUD requirements and regulations
- Coordinating the implementation of a housing and service system that meets the needs of the individuals and families who experience homelessness, including prevention and diversion strategies, outreach and engagement, coordinated assessment/entry, and exit, crisis shelter, emergency shelter, temporary housing, permanent housing, and supportive services
- Designing and implementing the process associated with applying for HUD CoC Program funds The Governance Charter outlines the roles and responsibilities of the Dos Rios Continuum of Care Board, Continuum of Care Committee(s), the Lead Agency/Collaborative Applicant and the Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) Lead. This Governance Charter was developed by the Continuum of Care and HMIS lead agency in consultation with homeless housing and service providers in the CoC geography and other CoC governance body members through a committee and feedback process.

Attachment Size
Dos Rios Continuum of Care Operating Manual (700.63 KB) 700.63 KB

Homeownership Assistance Program

Updated:
Attachment Size
You may qualify for our Homeownership Assistance Program! (522.31 KB) 522.31 KB

Home & Health Care Management

Updated:

HHAT Instruction Manual

Updated:
Attachment Size
HHAT Instruction Manual (96.59 KB) 96.59 KB

Healthy Housing Assessment Tool (HHAT)

Updated:
Attachment Size
Healthy Housing Assessment Tool (HHAT) (2.65 MB) 2.65 MB